Update on Gualsaquí
Dec21

Update on Gualsaquí

For a few weeks now I have been meaning to meet up with Pastor Luis of the Gualsaquí Church near Otavalo.  Today, I was in the area with my family and we decided to attend his church. As Pastor Luis greeted us, members of the church began leaving the sanctuary before the service had even really began.  Confused we realized what was going on.  In October, a short term team helped construct three walls to increase the Gualsaquí sanctuary and make room for the ever growing congregation. The roof of the church has been placed the day before with help from another local church we had worked with.  They had joined together along with financial blessings from God (and the local hardware store) to put up the roof.  Dressed in our Sunday best, alongside the congregation we got to work.  Today, we tore down walls and the old stage to make room for the expansion.  We filled buckets and wheelbarrows with dirt to fill the area where the new alter (stage) will be constructed. The hope is to have this all done before next week, which marks the birthday of the church and a huge celebration.  In January, they plan to have a huge evangelism event in the expanded sanctuary.  The new expansion has a lot of financial ties that still are yet to be met, but Pastor Luis and his congregation are trusting God to provide as He has done thus far. Please Pray: Financial provision for the Church in Gualsaquí and the other churches of Tangalí and Quichinche which Extreme sent a short term team in October. The new ECQ and the preparations needed for the next 40/40 team The last minute fundraising for the Manta 40/40 Church plant team Continued guidance in ministry Justin and I will be on vacation and not updating our blog most likely until mid January.  Everyone have a Merry Christmas and see you next year! Church in expanded sanctuary Destruction Time Filling the new stage Tearing down the wall Tearing down the old wall With Pastor Luis Justin & I with Pastor...

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Church Plant in Ibarra
Mar09

Church Plant in Ibarra

Extreme Nazarene’s Ibarra church plant celebrated its one year anniversary today.  It was an amazing church service to attend.  Justin and I along with others from Quito went to Ibarra to spend the weekend with our brothers and sisters there to celebrate in what God has done through them and the church. Saturday morning started with a children’s event hosted at a local daycare.  The event was full of singing, playing and of course snacks.  About thirty children along with some parents showed up for the shenanigans.  The children were eager to sing and dance with the energetic 40/40 staff.  One of the things that really struck me were some of the older boys from the church (probably between the ages of 11-14) who helped to lead skits and games were overall taking a huge part in the church at very young ages. This event and the next were also used to help train the upcoming 40/40 team set to depart for Cordoba, Argentina in May.  The youth group afterwards set out for a nursing home.  I watched as these young people who one year ago were living much different lives without Christ poured out His love on the people there.  For me, communication was difficult, but I watched as the high schooler and college age students offered prayer, nail painting, hand massages, lotion, card games or just a listening ear or hand to hold. Sunday morning, church was literally packed full.  Myself and other staff members stood outside the door for much of the service, where we could have a full view of this church worshiping together as one.  When one year ago, this building would of been an empty.  Today it was filled with children, adults and young people all worshiping in one spirit.  The church also celebrated its new leaders and those who had committed to beginning or continuing their leadership classes.  In the end, there were four graduated leaders to celebrate (with around 25 others still in classes) and I watched as one cried as the certificate was handed to her, because it was the first “diploma” she had ever received. The church in Ibarra along with its houses of prayers continue to grow.  It is a pleasure to be a part of this organization and to support these people as they impact their community in Ibarra.  This summer I am looking forward to many more opportunities to taking part in this community with the short term teams that are set to come there. Children’s Event Children’s Event Children’s Event Youth at the nursing home Church’s 1st...

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A Day in the Life
Feb23

A Day in the Life

A lot of people have predisposed ideas of what missionaries do.  We sleep on cots, live in the jungle, commute in canoes and overall everything is different than a first world country. Since the only time I have taken a canoe down a river (instead of a taxi, car or bus) was on a tour led by a tour guide,  I thought it would be better if I gave you a clearer look into my day to day routine here in Ecuador.  We wake up around 6 am to get ready for the day and do some devotions (I will be honest and say sometimes it maybe a little later for me).  We walk about fifteen minutes to work.  Instead of using machetes or a canoe through the jungle, it is actually more like dodging cars and traffic while keeping my laptop dry when I run across the street with it in my backpack.  On our later mornings, we stop by a bakery and buy breakfast on our way to work. I usually start working a little after eight am.  My current tasks have included insurance claims (which there have been a lot of lately), answering emails concerning small health problems, making doctor’s appointments for people here in Quito and making sure that everyone has the correct immunizations.  On Tuesdays and Thursdays, I take two different buses (about 45 minutes to an hour commute) to a local orphanage where I spend a couple of hours playing with children.  In the future, I hope to blog more about this, because it has really been a blessing to be a part of these children’s lives and to spend time with them.  There are two different houses for kids there so I split my time between them.  On Tuesdays, I play with and feed the babies who are all under two.  On Thursdays I wrestle with the kids between two and five. Afterwards, myself and my pepper spray walk down to the main street to find a taxi that is willing to take me across town for a decent price.  I pick up my Spanish teacher on the way to class and together we go to another missionary’s house where two of us try to further our Spanish.  I get back to my apartment usually between eight and nine, get some rest and then wake up to do it again.  Of course, being the nurse/medical coordinator that I am here sometimes my schedule can vary.  I can be awakened in the middle of the night or called while in the middle of work at the office and then everything is put aside.  This...

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